Monthly Archives: August 2014

DIY No Sew Window Valance

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So, this is obviously not my third wall hanging project.  I haven’t quite completed that one, mostly because I was sidetracked with some other projects.  This material may look familiar from my photo screen project.  I over bought the burlap I used for that project, but really liked it and wanted to incorporate it somewhere else in my kitchen…and this project was born.

Up until about two months ago this kitchen window had a pleated fabric shade hanging on it.  It was there when we moved in six years ago and it was just white so I left it there.  It, however, was apparently no longer happy hanging on my wall.  One Saturday morning while I was still upstairs, I heard a crash accompanied by breaking glass.  It turned out to be the blind falling off of my window and breaking a beloved vase on my window sill on it’s way down.  In protest of my broken vase, I threw the blind away.  Unfortunately, the sun sets directly behind the kitchen window and can be blinding while cleaning up dinner dishes.  Something had to be done!

Sewing burlap proves to be difficult, so I chose this project.

Here are the supplies you need as well as a piece of wood trim which you will see later.

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You will need to measure the size of your window.  I measured from the edges of the window frame.  You will also need to measure the length you would like the valance to be when it is finished and add two inches for the wood trim.  For now, cut the height you need but be sure it is wider than you would like the finished piece to be.  Cut the top and bottom edges with a straight edge and a rotary cutter.

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Next, attach the fusable backing leaving an overhang the same width as the ribbon you chose for the trim.  You will then pin and iron on the ribbon trim.  I chose a burlap ribbon with a wire trim.  (The wire turned out to be helpful in keeping shape while hanging.)

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Now, you will trim the sides to the exact width you are looking for using a straigh edge and a rotary tool.

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Now, measure up from the bottom to the length you want and attach the trim piece 1/4 inch above that using a staple gun.

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All that is left is hanging it up on your window.  To do this I drilled two screws directly into the molding on my window.

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And there you go, this was literally hanging on my window within an hour of when I started.

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                                                                                                            Happy creating!

Category: Uncategorized

DIY Memo Screen

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Alright, here is the second of my little project trio.  I am calling this DIY memo screen mostly because I started the project with an old screen.  I figure that this will come in handy in the kitchen for holding photos, or cards, and at Christmas time, all those Christmas cards.

This was a fairly quick project that can be tailored to match your taste with paint color and fabric choice. I stuck with neutral colors to coordinate with the chalkboard I completed in my last post.

So, here is a quick how to…

I started with a $2 screen.

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This picture was taken after I removed the  old hardware which consisted of a badly painted wood knob and badly painted hinges.  I also removed the trim that covered the edge of the screen webbing.  The trim popped off easily with the aide of a screw driver which I used as a little pry bar.  I left the nails in the trim and simply reattached it in the same holes when I was ready.

I sanded down the outside, repainted the whole thing with two coats of spraypaint and a coat of clear gloss.  I also purchased a new knob for $3.  I couldn’t find new hinges that fit exactly in the knotches that were already there, so I ended up sanding and spraypainting the hinges I had.  They are not used, simply decorative, so I don’t need to worry about the paint wearing or chipping.

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I chose to use burlap with a pattern on it for the center of my screen.  I had a hard time finding ribbon that I was happy with, but settled on a chocolate brown.  I pinned the ribbon down and used my sewing machine to tack down the ribbon.  You could also stitch it by hand or use a fabric glue.  The problem with the fabric glue is it can let go, especially on burlap, and I didn’t want to worry about that.

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I used a rotary cutter and a straight edge to cut the burlap to size.

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I trimmed off the excess ribbon and reattached the   trim to cover the edges of the burlap.  As I said earlier, I used the nails that were still attached to the trim and hammered it in with a rubber mallet. I ran a small bead of liquid nails on the underside of each trim piece to be sure of a good hold.

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And there you go! Your very own memo screen…

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One project to go, and my wall will finally be filled.

Category: Uncategorized

DIY Chalkboard

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This DIY chalkboard is the first of three projects I am doing to fill a space that I have been staring at for six years. Every time I sit down to dinner I am faced with a large wall that has plaqued me for years. Ther have been pictures on and off of it many times, but nothing has really worked for me. I have been looking for something large enough to fill the space, but not something that is too overwhelming.

Several months back I made my cork boards for the wall opposite this current one. (See DIY cork boards.) I considered making more for this wall, but I didn’t want to take away from what I had already done. Then, a huge stack of Restoration Hardware catalogs came in and an idea was born.

I started with a window frame that I purchased at a place called Buffalo Resuse, they sell almost anything that has come out of a house or old buildings. It cost $4. One of the window panes was already broken, but that didn’t matter to me because I wasn’t using them anyway.
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I spent a lot of time with a corner cat sander getting the peeling paint off and getting the remaining paint to look the way I wanted it to. Please note that if you are using an old window, or any old materials, lead paint was probably used, and precautions should be taken. Once I had the sanding done and the right amout of wood exposed, I used a gloss spraypaint to seal my project and give it a shine.

I purchased this chalkboard spraypaint at Home Depot.
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I used aluminum flashing that I cut to size with a razor blade and spray painted it with the chalkboard paint. I then cut thin plywood to size to mount behind the aluminum.
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Glazing points can be easily hammered in to hold it all together.

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I used an upside down drawer pull to hold a piece of chalk.
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And voila! You are done. The great part is that windows come in so many shapes and sizes, you can fill almost any space with them. Until next ime, happy creating.
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Category: Create